Top 5: Conceptual rugs

By Penny Craswell

Rugs don’t have to make a big statement to be beautiful – many of the best rugs are designed to be subtle, with one concept differentiating it from the crowd. These five new rug ranges are made from a range of materials and with a variety of design ideas, all of which are successful in their originality and soft concept.

1. Armadillo&Co is an Australian company, founded by Jodie Fried and Sally Pottharst, producing hand-made, fair trade and sustainable rugs. As well as benefiting from the long tradition that their weavers in India, Nepal and Pakistan bring to these hand-knotted rugs, Armadillo&Co is also committed to social responsibility, supporting their weavers’ communities through building schools and other social programs. More on Armadillo&Co

Heirloom Collection, Persian Knot Rug, Babylon in Sterling Bronze by Armadillo Co. The Design Writer blog.
Heirloom Collection, Persian Knot Rug, Babylon in Sterling Bronze by Armadillo&Co. Image: supplied
Latitude collection, Berber Knot rug, Savannah in Chalk by Armadillo & Co. The Design Writer blog.
Latitude collection, Berber Knot Rug, Savannah in Chalk by Armadillo&Co. Image: supplied


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Iittala relaunches in Australia

By Penny Craswell

The popularity of Finnish design brand Iittala in Australia might not have come as a surprise to International Brand Manager of Iittala Siru Nori during her recent trip to Australia to rerelease the brand. But the ubiquity of Iittala glassware – in particular classic designs such as the Ultima Thule from the 1960s – and the number of collectors that the brand has here might have been less expected.

Iittala X Issey Miyake. Image: supplied
Iittala X Issey Miyake. Image: supplied

Perhaps the enduring power of Iittala is due to its timelessness – many of these collectibles look just as good now as they did when they were first released. The Alvar Aalto Vase is a perfect example of this, retaining its relevance thanks to its sculptural, architectural form without dipping in and out of fashion as so many other pieces do. Originally designed in 1936, this vase is mouth blown in Iittala’s Finnish factory where it takes seven people to make one vase. Read more

Top 10: Beautiful ceramics

By Penny Craswell

Did you know that the Dutch craze for blue and white ceramics was, at least in part, the result of piracy? In 1603, the Santa Catarina, a Portuguese merchant ship, was seized by the Dutch East India Company off the coast of Singapore with over 100,000 pieces of Chinese porcelain on board. Even though Holland was at war with Portugal at the time, there’s no doubt that this was an act of piracy – the crew were vouchsafed their lives in return for handing over the loot. When this cargo was sold in Amsterdam, it caused a great sensation, and blue and white ceramics became the hottest trend in town, not just for the aristocracy, but for everyone.

Celebrating 500 years of medieval Dutch painter Jhernimous Bosch is Jheroplate white by Royal Delft
Celebrating 500 years of medieval Dutch painter Jhernimous Bosch is Jheroplate white by Royal Delft



Although the potters in Delft originally copied the Chinese designs due to the huge popularity of the originals from that ship, they began incorporating Dutch motifs and original designs through the 1600s, and Defltware became the most popular and biggest selling makers of ceramics from 1600 to 1800. The style is still popular today and it’s possible to visit the factory of Royal Delft to see ceramics being the made the same way they have been for over 400 years.
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