Review: Green Ladder pavilion by Vo Trong Nghia

By Penny Craswell

The latest Fugitive Structures pavilion to be commissioned by the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation (SCAF) is a bamboo structure called “Green Ladder” designed by architect du jour Vo Trong Nghia whose mission is to bring back greenery into the city via architecture, especially in his home country of Vietnam.

Green Ladder designed by Vo Trong Nghia Architects for the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation. Photo: Dianna Snape
Green Ladder designed by Vo Trong Nghia Architects for the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation. Photo: Dianna Snape


In my role as media consultant of the Fugitive Structures architecture pavilion series for SCAF, I was able to meet Nghia and also speak to him about the structure, as well as hear some behind-the-scenes details of the bamboo treatment process used on the installation. Read more

Fugitive Structures at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation

By Penny Craswell

Two new structures straddling architecture, design and art by Robert Beson from AR-MA, and Tomek Archer and Toby Breakspear from Tomahawk // Archer Breakspear were commissioned by Sydney’s Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation for the second year of Fugitive Structures, a program inviting architects to use innovative design and technology to create small-scale temporary works at the gallery.

In the courtyard of the Sydney art foundation, Robert Beson and team from AR-MA has created a structure called Trifolium made of a skin of 152 Corian pieces thermally formed and robotically trimmed. The interior features 152 laser-cut cylindrical, black mirror-polished interior panels.

Trifolium by AR-MA
Trifolium by AR-MA. Photo: Jacob Ring.

Poly, the other structure, sits inside the gallery. Created by Tomek Archer and Toby Breakspear from Tomahawk // Archer Breakspear, this work is a series of structures, half furniture and half architecture, that can be rolled across the floor to create dynamic interactions.

Poly by Tomahawk // Breakspear. Photo: Brett Boardman.

Read more about Trifolium and Poly at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation.