Perth house, with sculptural brick extension

By Penny Craswell

In the Perth suburb of Mt Lawley, a sculptural form pops out above the houses, an irregular tower made of red clay shingles that seems to wrap in on itself in an unusual architectural shape that is also strangely familiar. This is the Camino House, a Perth house extension designed by Bosske and inspired by the shape of a kiln or oast (a traditional building where hops is dried as part of the brewing process).

View from the street, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
View from the street, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts


“We initially envisaged the extension as a distinct object, as different to the existing house,” explains Caroline Hickey of Bosske. “It could be something which might ‘sit’ behind it, lean against it, looming above it from the street view, creating a casual relationship between these two elements.”

As a result, the form had to be made of a single element to create a unified aesthetic – and that element is clay shingles. “To express it as a singular thing, we looked at materials that could wrap around everything – the walls, the roof, corners, and incorporate gutters,” explains Caroline. Clay shingles proved to be highly versatile and, due to their natural colour, add a subtle variation to the building’s appearance which is very human. “They have a natural ‘loose-ness’ or ‘softness’ in the way they tile over framework, so they don’t look too precise or precious, which we like.”

View from the back, Camino House designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
View from the back, Camino House designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Detail of the clay form, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Detail of the clay form, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts




Caroline and the team spent a long time 3D modelling the form, also consulting with the builder and roofing contractor to create a continuous surface using a range of different tile joins. The result is a lopsided square shape that is a direct reference to the traditional square oast or kiln, with an additional fold here and there. 
The design also relates to the smattering of industrial elements that exist in this residential suburb, where Italian migrants built vegetable gardens, lean-tos, drying sheds, incinerators and pizza ovens as additions to the residential buildings.

“There are a few of these types of buildings in the neighborhood,” says Caroline. “The Lincoln Street incinerator is a good example. These buildings take on a relic or ‘ruin’ type role in their suburban setting. The clay tiles are often used for these architectural forms – brick kilns, oasts etc, so we thought that the material was important to carry the idea.”

Living space, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Living space, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Kitchen view, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Kitchen view, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts



The extension, which is quite small at 80sqm over 2 levels and balances with the 70sqm original house, was built as a separate building, allowing more freedom in the construction process than an integrated build, while the small footprint offers more outdoor space, unusual for a Perth house. Meanwhile the size and shape of the form also creates a thermal chimney, encouraging air circulation and releasing excess heat through the skylight at the top.

Camino House won the Think Brick Roof Tile Excellence Award 2015

 

Opening up completely, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Opening up completely, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Profile, view outside in, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Profile, view outside in, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Industrial aesthetic mixed in with suburban housing, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
Industrial aesthetic mixed in with suburban housing, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
The extension pops up above the existing house, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts
The extension pops up above the existing house, Camino House, designed by Bosske. Photo: Peter Bennetts

 

3 thoughts on “Perth house, with sculptural brick extension

  • January 14, 2016 at 1:14 am
    Permalink

    Looks great, love it when clients are open to something a bit different. Shame they seem to have lost there back yard to the dreaded dead space.

    Reply
  • January 15, 2016 at 4:19 am
    Permalink

    Thanks for the comment Daniel – the architects did say that they wanted to retain some of the existing external space as most Perth houses tend to lose all of their back yard to the extension. It would be interesting to find out from the owners if they use the external space out the back. Penny

    Reply
    • January 22, 2016 at 4:19 am
      Permalink

      The current ‘backyard’ is a subdivided lot for future development – urban infill.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *